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Maxthon Web browser debuts on Apple

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Search on: Maxthon, which has offices in San Francisco, produces a Web browser used by more than 130 million people worldwide. The newest version of the Chinese company’s software has several time-saving features. - COURTESY PHOTO
  • Courtesy Photo
  • Search on: Maxthon, which has offices in San Francisco, produces a Web browser used by more than 130 million people worldwide. The newest version of the Chinese company’s software has several time-saving features.

With Safari, Firefox, Google Chrome and Internet Explorer firmly atop the Web browser world, it might seem intimidating to enter the market. But one company was brave enough to make the leap.

Maxthon, which has offices in San Francisco and is headquartered in China, is a global software company that develops state-of-the-art Web browsers. This week, it’s launching its product for Apple computers.  

More than 130 million people worldwide use the Maxthon browser for Windows, Android, BlackBerry, Kindle Fire and Nook. The browser is currently available in 52 different languages.

“We’re really lucky,” said Karl Mattson, chief of product development for Maxthon. “The first people who used the browser loved it and were able to spread it around the world.”

Maxthon 3, the company’s latest browser, is known for its speed, efficient memory usage, built-in features and HTML5 leadership. The browser also offers tech-savvy tools such as Split Screen, which lets users split browsers in two and view two windows side by side, and Night Mode, which changes pages to make them easier to see.

The browser includes several features that save customers from having to find plug-ins to do certain jobs.

“A lot of people choose to use Maxthon for one of two reasons: They either come for the performance and stay for the freedom, or they come for freedom and stay for the performance,” Mattson said, adding that Maxthon made the choice to be platform independent. “Users will often literally tell us they don’t want a single company providing and maintaining their Web mail, search and Web browser.”

Darcy Provo, a senior counselor for Landis Communications, said there’s a certain logic to that stance that is undeniable.

“Walled gardens are nice, but they are just that — walled,” Provo said. “Eventually it becomes difficult for any company to keep users within the garden walls.”

ssaya@sfexaminer.com