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Sponsorship of Pride is a sticky situation

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Corporate sponsors for Pride

The Sunday meeting to vote for candidates for the Pride board brought out some interesting dilemmas facing new members. Some questions to candidates covered whether we should continue to have corporations support the Pride march. One audience member was concerned about the Board meeting serving Coke because of its history in environmental destruction and poor employee relations.

Corporations are destroying our democracy, so why are we supporting them by allowing them to sponsor our Pride Parade? It is a little cynical to say, "We'll take the money and run," as one candidate expressed. Unfortunately, we cannot run away from our obligations to other people (especially in the LGBT community) around the world who are suffering discrimination, torture and death because of corporations' control over foreign policies, including propping up dictators. If we choose between one company and another based on current tragic events, such as the BP spill, it is a foolish tack when all oil companies are complicit in destroying our environment simply by producing their products.

The list of corporate crimes and worker abuses is endless. We choose to ignore corporations' crimes simply because, unfortunately, we rely on some of their products to survive. However, to highlight these criminals at a parade that host millions of people is a crime in itself.

Denise D'Anne,

San Francisco

"Navy Yard gunman told police he was hearing voices," News, Wednesday

More guns in wrong hands

The Navy Yard shooter has a troubling history handling firearms. He shot through the floor of the apartment above him, claiming it was an accident while cleaning a gun he "didn't know was loaded"!

In a rage, he shot out the tires of another neighbor's car. Still, he was allowed to buy and own guns. Shouldn't that person be banned from gun handling and ownership for life?

Would the NRA's solution be for a "good guy with a gun" upstairs to shoot back, and for a "good guy" whose tires were shot out to fire back? Do they have another twisted way of looking at this recent massacre involving guns in the wrong hands?

Jorg Aadahl,

San Mateo

NRA blocking gun reform

In the aftermath of the Washington Navy Yard shooting, there will again be calls for federal gun-control legislation. But such efforts again will be doomed because too many legislators are overly responsive to the National Rifle Association lobby, in tandem with gunmakers and importers, military sympathizers and far-right organizations. And after all the sound and fury is over, the cycle of killings, hand-wringing and mourning will continue ad infinitum.

Ralph E. Stone,

San Francisco

"San Francisco immigration hold legislation tweaked after support wanes," The City, Tuesday

S.F. inviting criminals in

Your story provides a perfect example of why The City has so many self-inflicted problems. Here you have a proposal that will prohibit local law enforcement from detaining any undocumented immigrant suspected of committing a crime, even if that crime is a violent felony such as murder or rape.

This will make The City a destination for violent criminals. Somebody once said the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again expecting a different result.

Voters better regain their sanity soon and get some new supervisors, or have nobody but themselves to blame for these problems.

E.F. Sullivan,

San Francisco